Crossing beams on a daily basis ...

prostheticknowledge:

Kepler’s Dream

Project by Michael Burk is an analogue projection device to intimately view 3D printed objects  - video embedded below:

Kepler’s Dream is an aesthetical investigation, exploring analog projection technology in the combination with computationally created content that is given a physical shape through 3D printing.

Inspired by obsolete projection technologies like the overhead projector, and especially the episcope, an installation was designed that generates unique imagery and a fascinating experience.
Mixing digital aesthetics - parametric and generative shapes - with the qualities of analog projection creates an otherworldly look that seems to be neither digital nor analog.
Interacting with the installation creates a deeply immersive effect, as the instant reaction of the projection and the “infinite frame rate“ let this fantastical world come to life.

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(via notational)

(Source: brokenhyoid, via neutrinoid)

alhive:

Roland Shainidze

ravenkwok:

Moar…

ravenkwok:

Playing with wblut’s new released HE_Mesh2014 library. (https://github.com/wblut/HE_Mesh2014)
beeple:

ONE FOOT

ryanpanos:

Landesgartenschau Exhibition Hall | ICD/ITKE/IIGS University of Stuttgart | Via

The Landesgartenschau Exhibition Hall is an architectural prototype building and a showcase for the current developments in computational design and robotic fabrication for lightweight timber construction. Funded by the European Union and the state of Baden‐Württemberg, the building is the first to have its primary structure entirely made of robotically prefabricated beech plywood plates. The newly developed timber construction offers not only innovative architectural possibilities; it is also highly resource efficient, with the load bearing plate structure being just 50mm thin. This is made possible through integrative computational design, simulation, fabrication and surveying methods.

(via treeashouse)

dlsamson:

Dyn/01 - Daniel Samson

rudygodinez:

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)

 Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.

(via kamend)

supersonicart:

Greg Klassen.

To make his furniture, artist Greg Klassen collects trees (in a sustainable way, I might mention) from the river bed of the Nooksack River which flows near his home in Lynden, Washington and then transforms them into gorgeous works of art; cutting, carving and sanding them all by hand.  You can see more of the gorgeous work below!

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